Permanent Makeup FAQ’s

Q: What is Permanent Makeup?
A: Permanent Makeup is a cosmetic procedure where extremely tiny amounts of natural pigments are inserted into the dermal layer of the skin. This is an increasingly popular cosmetic option for females.

Q: Why would a young female sailor want Permanent Makeup?
A:  Permanent makeup may be desired by females who don’t want to spend a lot of time applying makeup every day. This procedure is especially attractive to females who have light, sparse or half eyebrows or sparse eye lashes or no eye lashes, are physically active, or who have oily skin that sheds makeup easily.  Females that possess poorly defined or descending lips may also desire this procedure. Continue reading “Permanent Makeup FAQ’s”

Service Uniform FAQs

One of the four main objectives in the Task Force Uniform (TFU) charter, which was signed out
by the Vice Chief of Naval Operations in February 2003, was to develop a service uniform for
year-round wear for E-6 and below. The more than 40,000 Sailors who took part in the
fleetwide survey told us that their seabag was too cluttered, the current service uniforms were
too difficult to maintain, and there was a strong desire for a year-round uniform.

When will we see this new uniform implemented?
After the completion of the approximately six-month wear test beginning this winter, the data
will be collected from the fleetwide survey, and results and recommendations will be brought to
the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). If a decision to change is made by CNO, the goal will be
to begin phasing in the new uniform for Sailors in the fleet within 18-24 months from that point.

If these new uniforms were chosen, would we be required to immediately replace
our old uniforms?
No. There would be an implementation phase so that Sailors could use their yearly uniform
allowance to replace their old uniforms. Our expectations would be for current uniforms to live
out their intended wear-life before being replaced with a new service uniform.

Why these colors?
We wanted to choose colors that would be distinguishable to our naval service, to give our
Sailors a recognizable uniform apart from other services. The colors we chose were bluish
gray and khaki. By using colors that are traditional Navy colors, we continue to uphold our
naval heritage, while giving our Sailors a uniform that is much more practical for our working
environment.
Are we trying to look like Marines?
While trying to find a functional year-round service uniform for Sailors E-6 and below, our
intent was not to try and make us look like any of the other services. However, the concept we
are testing is in line with other services (i.e., a non-vertical match (tops and bottoms are
different colors).

What about maintenance/care of these uniforms?
Included in the wear test will be uniforms with fabrics that are “dry clean only,” as well as “wash
and wear.” Feedback from the fleet will be required on which style fabric they believe holds up
best under average maintenance, which is most cost effective, and what offers the best
appearance for their working environment. The fabrics for the shirts being tested will be made
of different blends of poly/wool. One is a lighter blend (wash and wear), the other a little
heavier (dry clean only).

What about the wear test survey?
Sailors will be asked for their opinions of the concept uniforms approximately 45-60 days after
the wear test begins this winter. This survey will be available electronically, and all Sailors will
be allowed to participate, regardless if they have worn or seen the actual concept uniforms
firsthand.

Task Force Uniform will take into account feedback from our Sailors to help design the best
possible uniforms for the present and future needs of our Navy. The manner of wear issues will
be developed and evaluated throughout the wear test process. All of the wear policies are yet
to be determined, and some will be driven by the outcome of the wear test.

What about those of us who work in cooler environments? Will we be in short
sleeves all year?
The concept uniforms are short-sleeved uniforms. Because the type of work done in a service
uniform is typically in a climate-controlled environment, there is not as much of a need for a
long-sleeve uniform. However, the Navy is also wear testing a jacket to be worn with the
service uniform, and there is also an optional sweater currently in the seabag that can be worn
if necessary. This is consistent with the manner of wear currently used for E-7 and above in
service khakis in all climates.

Will we still have tropical uniforms for those of us in the warmer climates?
Tropical uniforms will be phased out if one of the service uniform concepts are chosen.
Because the type of work done in a service uniform is typically in a climate-controlled
environment, there is no longer a need for a tropical uniform.

Will a tie be an optional component to the new service uniform?
Not at this time. E-7 and above service uniforms are subject to review in the next Phase of
Task Force Uniform. Before we decide to extend the components of the E-6 and below service
uniforms, we want to determine what the E-7 and above will be wearing. TFU is trying to
eliminate the number of disparate uniform component requirements between E-6 and below,
and E-7 and above.

Will ribbons be optional, similar to the winter working blue?
No, not at this time. We will be developing the final wear-test requirements throughout the wear
test, and once the final decision has been made. Navy service uniforms are all currently worn
with ribbons. Within the scope of the wear test, there may be a limited test where the uniforms
are worn without ribbons.

Why is the Navy testing only one trouser color?
The navy blue trouser was not identified as an issue by the fleet in the last uniform survey. In
fact, a darker trouser was said to be more functional and practical. So we went with what we
have in our uniform inventory, but upgraded the quality of the material to be equal to E-7 and
above trousers/slacks.

Will the white hat be authorized to wear with it? What will be the required cover for
the new service uniforms?
No, the white hat is not authorized to be worn with this uniform. The required cover will be the
black garrison cap for males, and the black garrison cap or beret for females. It’s a matter of
practicality.

How will the new concept uniforms be affected by the recent uniform changes with
purses, cell phones, backpacks, etc.?
The concept uniforms were designed to include the recent changes. Purses will still be
required to match the shoe color, official cell phones may still be worn (provided the uniform
has a belt), and backpacks will still be required to be black or dark blue in color.

Why would we want to take the rating badge off the service uniform?
According to data taken from the survey results, Sailors from the fleet said it would be more
cost effective to replace the rating badge with a collar device that could be taken on and off a
uniform, and easily updated upon promotion. During the wear-test, we will attempt to gather
more data to determine which of the two options Sailors prefer and which works the best to
meet the needs of our Sailors.

Why doesn’t the rating badge on the concept uniforms have a specialty mark?
Because of the diverse cross section of the Sailors who will be wear testing the concept
uniforms, it was not cost effective for the Navy to develop a test uniform rating badge
containing a specialty mark for every rating in the Navy. If the wear-test determines that the
new service uniforms will feature a rating badge, the future uniforms will contain specialty
marks for every rating.

Will female CPOs have the opportunity to wear the khaki overblouse?
Currently, the wear test is only for E-6 and below. However, because of the repeated request
by E-7 and above to participate in the service uniform wear test, there is discussion of a
possible wear test of the khaki female overblouse in a future phase of Task Force Uniform.

Navy Working Uniform FAQ’s

What is the plan for wear-testing the Navy Working Uniform concept?
The fleet-wide wear test, currently underway, will be conducted at commands around the world,
and across the spectrum of different platforms.  Approximately 60 participants, both male and
female, officer and enlisted, will wear-test these concept uniforms at commands/locations:

When will we see this new uniform implemented in the fleet?
After the completion of the six-month wear test, the data will be collected from the fleet-wide
survey, and results and recommendations will be brought to the CNO.  The final decision on
the Navy Working Uniform will be made by CNO, and if a final version is approved, the goal will
be to phase in the new uniform to Sailors in the fleet within 18-24 months from that point.

Why these colors?
By using colors that are traditional Navy colors, we continue to uphold our naval heritage, while
giving our Sailors a uniform that is much more practical for our working environment.

Why the ‘camouflage’ pattern?
The concept uniforms are not intended to be ‘camouflage’ uniforms as is the case with similarly
patterned uniforms of the other services.  We have no need for camouflage.  However, by
learning from our past working uniforms as well as the uniforms from other services, the Navy
realized that a solid cover uniform shows heavy wear areas much more predominantly than a
multicolored pattern.

The solid color uniforms also show wrinkles in the fabric more predominantly and often a small
stain or spot of paint renders a solid colored uniform not wearable.  A multicolored uniform
alleviates those problems as well.

The wear test will offer a chance to evaluate a traditional woodland pattern and a modern
digital pattern for the working uniform.

What about Sailors who operate in tactical environments, such as Seabees, SEALS?
The NWU concept is designed to be a working uniform, not a tactical uniform.   When Sailors
are working in tactical environments, such as the desert, or in the field, they will still be outfitted
with the appropriate tactical uniforms.  Part of the working uniform will include a Gore-Tex
parka as well as a turtleneck sweater to protect against adverse weather conditions.

Will Sailors be allowed to wear this uniform off base?
Yes. This uniform is being designed to be authorized for wear off base while commuting to and
from work, but not on liberty.

What about maintenance/care of these uniforms?
These year-round uniforms are intended to be wash-and-wear.  Future Navy ships are being
built without dry cleaning facilities; Sailors did not like the idea of putting an iron to a uniform in
which they are going to be doing heavy work.

By being able to take a uniform straight from the dryer and put up on the hanger for daily wear
is much more practical and appeasing to both Sailors’ busy schedule and pocketbook.

In addition, the camouflage pattern will permit mending of small rips in uniform fabric, saving
Sailors considerably in replacement costs.

What about shipboard fire safety?  Or visibility and floatation in case of a Sailor
falling overboard?
No current Navy uniform in the seabag was developed purposefully to fight a shipboard fire or
to enhance visibility or floatation in the water.  Every Navy ship is equipped with Fire Fighting
Ensemble (FFE) and necessary personal protective equipment to combat shipboard fires, as
well as floatation gear with flares and dyes for those purposes.

Navy uniforms are required to meet specific fire retardant standards, and these NWU concepts
also meet those requirements.

The uniforms were developed keeping in mind that our Sailors must have a uniform that, if
necessary, can help resist a certain degree of intense heat without causing injury.

What about the wear test survey?
Sailors will be asked for their opinions of the concept uniforms approximately 60 days after the
wear test begins.  This survey will be available electronically; all Sailors will be allowed to
participate regardless if they have worn or seen the actual concept uniforms first-hand.

Task Force Uniform will take into account feedback from our Sailors to help design the best
possible uniforms for the present and future needs of our Navy.

Throughout the process, the feedback Task Force Uniform receives from Sailors will influence
working uniform wear policies, most of which will driven by the outcome of the wear test.

Can I wear my command ball cap?
Command ballcaps have already been wear tested in the fleet, so they will not need to be
included in this wear test. During the wear test, only two covers will be tested, the round cover
and the eight-point cover, both in the digital and woodland patterns.  No current uniform
covers will be worn in the wear test.   The wear of command ballcaps will be addressed when
the final wear policies are decided.

How will the wear policy for these uniforms be decided?
The wear policy will be developed through convention and wear test, and will not be finalized
until all of the feedback and data have been fully evaluated.